What we learned:

Kendall Wright: Bears need more targets, not new receivers

The Bears on Wednesday practiced indoors for Saturday’s road game against the Lions. Here are a couple of things we learned at Halas Hall.

Kendall Wright disagrees that the Bears need new receivers.

To the veteran slot receiver, the group’s collective lack of production is a matter of targets, not talent. No team has thrown fewer passes this season than the Bears’ 367.

“We don’t get the opportunities that most receivers get,” Wright said.

He said so-called “good” receivers are targeted a dozen times a game.

“How do you know if you’re good or not if you’re only getting two or three targets a game?” Wright said. “If you watch somebody else’s games, Antonio Brown (of the Steelers) would have 15 targets and he’s great.

“You come to our game, we have two and (it’s), ‘Aw, the Bears need receivers.’ They don’t need receivers. When you balance it up, you see what our receivers do.”

Wright’s comments followed his 10-catch, 107-yard performance in Sunday’s victory over the Bengals. They were the most catches and yards for the Bear this season. Afterward, he called the team’s receiving corps “7-Eleven” because they’re always open.

The Bears’ tendency not to throw this season is rooted in several factors. Coach John Fox prefers to run the ball, a strategy that takes into account his relative lack of confidence in the passing game. Obviously that includes a rookie quarterback in Mitch Trubisky who still is learning.

Offensive coordinator Dowell Loggains has publicly criticized his receivers at times this season for running the wrong depth on routes or rounding off cuts that are supposed to be sharp.

In general, Bears coaches and management have lamented receivers’ inconsistency beating man coverage. The team plans to overhaul most, if not all, of its receiving corps in the offseason.

Defensive coordinator Vic Fangio believes Kyle Fuller has more interceptions in him.

As the Bears’ Twitter account repeatedly pushed the veteran cornerback for the Pro Bowl on Wednesday, it rang hollow because Fuller has only one interception this season.

Cornerbacks surge into the annual Pro Bowl discussion because of picks. Aside from Broncos All-Pro Chris Harris, who had only two interceptions, each of the other seven Pro Bowl cornerbacks last season had at least three.

Fuller has had a solid year, improving his availability and the frequency with which he has broken up passes. But let’s not get carried away with Pro Bowl chatter. He was in coverage on the decisive touchdown pass in the devastating home loss to the Packers and on a touchdown in the home loss to the Vikings, to name two critical negative plays.

Fuller’s interceptions total was a topic of conversation after his most recent drop of a potential pick occurred Sunday against the Bengals.

“I think Kyle actually has good hands,” Fangio said, adding that assessment is based on practice performance. “But a few he has had a chance at he hasn’t been able to finish.

“They haven’t been thrown right (to him), and he clanks it and drops it. They’ve had some toughness to it. Sometimes the receiver has turned into him and knocked it out, and (Fuller) has had to tussle for the ball.”

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